Conventional wisdom suggests that strength training increases body mass index (BMI) in a positive way, but does it? BMI is an estimate of body fat determined by your height and weight. The index is determined by the formula BMI = kg/m2.  This is an individual's weight in kilograms divided by their height in meters squared. A BMI of more than 25.0 is considered overweight, while 18.5 to 24.9 for most adults considered healthy. There are many body mass index calculators located on the internet to check out where you theoretically stand.

It has long been argued that heavily muscled, weight-trained individuals are healthy despite their BMI classification. This is substantiated by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which has indicated that BMI may overestimate body fat in athletes and others who have muscular builds and the values do not represent many of those who are fit.

What has to be considered other than body fat in the heavily muscular population is peripheral resistance. Peripheral resistance is a function of the internal vessel diameter, vessel length and blood viscosity.

Having a large body and an undeveloped neck changes the force of the delivery system’s blood flow to the head. Normal circulation is important. Strength training increases blood flow and vascular conductance, an important reason to make sure neck training is inclusive in any strength training program.

So, if your BMI is high, yet you are heavily muscled and fit, make sure neck training is part of your training regime. All parts of the anatomy are important and inclusive in exercise. Train the entire system Get the neck Strong.

Neck training on the Pendulum Neck Machine
Neck Flexion on the Pendulum 5-Way Neck