Swim/bike/run competition originated in the 1920's in France. In 1974 the first 'modern triathlon' was held with 46 participants in San Diego, California. The sport has grown into a World, Olympic and a Paralympic event. 

Cyclist

The neck is among the most common overuse injuries in cyclists. As this physically demanding, wonderfully challenging, sport has grown so has the number of participants that have visited neurosurgery clinics with neck and back pain. It is a reminder that it is always important to train the entire system. 

In a study published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, Neck pain in multisport athletes, it was found in a questionnaire to triathletes that 64% had sport related neck pain.

The cycling portion of the triathlon requires neck extension posture. The neck extensors and traps are active for hours and as fatigue sets in the suboccipitals are stressed as the participant needs to keep eyes up and the  head often in full length neck extension to safely follow the road.

When preparing for biking, swimming, running or any sport, make sure head and neck is always an important part of your exercise program. Below Doug Scott the strength and conditioning coach for the Pingry School in Basking Ridge, New Jersey regularly includes neck strength training as part of his race regime. Doug recently finished the Lake Placid, Ironman Triathlon. Exercising at a competitive pace for 13 hours with zero complications is a tribute to his method, knowledge and training approach. Get Strong and Stay Strong to finish Strong.

Runner